Category Archives: Pocomoke

Path into the Pocomoke Forest

The Haunted Pocomoke Forest and its Urban Legends

Urban Legends and Folklore About the Pocomoke – Most Haunted Forest in Maryland


Pocomoke Forest most haunted forest in Maryland

There’s nothing like some good old urban legends about severed heads, hitchhikers and ladies in white to get the conversation going around a campfire. There are scores of these stories set in Pocomoke Forest – all alleged to be true. In fact, there was even a research paper about the forest and its lore in the Folklore collection at the Edward H. Nabb Center at Salisbury University. Here are some of the most intriguing tales of the forest.

The Boyfriend

A boy and a girl were in a car and ran out of gas. They heard something. The boy got out to look for a phone and he told her not to turn around or get out of the car and to lock all the Continue reading The Haunted Pocomoke Forest and its Urban Legends

Get Touched in the Haunted Pocomoke Forest

Guests walk into the Pocomoke Forest under a full moon
Guests walk into the Pocomoke Forest under a full moon – orbs above.

I am a ghost-story teller. I live in a haunted house, but I am not afraid of anything from the spirit world anymore – except the spirits in the Pocomoke Forest. Out of the 130+ stories I’ve integrated into our ten ghost walks, there are only a handful where I’ve had a personal experience …. The Snow Hil Inn, the Trimper’s Carousel, the Robert Morris Inn, The Atlantic Hotel (Berlin), the Marva Theater  AND – The Pocomoke Forest… and that one scared me so bad, that I couldn’t get out of that forest fast enough — but I had to act like I wasn’t afraid so as not to startle the 24 people following behind me (who were already scared by what had happened). Continue reading Get Touched in the Haunted Pocomoke Forest

Haunted Minute – The Pocomoke River

Pocomoke River – Black Water

In this video, Ghost Walk guide, Mindie Burgoyne tells about Maryland’s most haunted River – The Pocomoke.

The Pocomoke River is the deepest water for its width in the United States and the second deepest in the world – 2nd only to the Nile River. Its name means “black water” and just four to six feet below the surface there is no ambient light. The water is black.

There are many stories of hauntings along the river – phantom ships, spirits who walk on the water, baby cries coming from nowhere.. and more. In this video, Mindie Burgoyne tells the story of Job Emmons and spirits seen walking on the water just east of the Pocomoke River drawbridge.

Join the Pocomoke Ghost Walk to hear the full story.


Path into the Pocomoke Forest

Who or What Touched Me in the Pocomoke Forest?

by Mindie Burgoyne – owner, Chesapeake Ghost Walks

In fairy tales and ghost stories, the two most haunted settings are forests and swamps. The Pocomoke Forest is both. It’s a swampy forest, and it lives up to the eerie expectation. It’s undoubtedly the most haunted forest in Maryland with over a dozen tales of witches, devil worshippers, elementals and human spirits that roam the dark forest  – especially at night.

The word Pocomoke is said to be an Algonquin Indian term meaning “black water.” And the Pocomoke River does appear to be black in color because of the sap secreted by the bald cypresses in that line both sides of the River from Pocomoke all the way into Delaware. Continue reading Who or What Touched Me in the Pocomoke Forest?

Ghost Walk into the Pocomoke Forest

Pocomoke Forest Trail
Pocomoke Forest Trail

Have you ever taken a night-time walk into a haunted forest?  The Pocomoke Ghost Walk trail meanders 1/4 of a mile into this thick cypress swamp while the guide tells stories of the haunted forest and spirits that lurk there.

The Goat Man of the Pocomoke River

One such story is Goat Man of Pocomoke Forest.  For years it’s been seen – a kind of Big Foot character who has a man’s body with the head of a goat – with horns.  He runs through the swampy forest very light on his feet. He survives by eating small animals and fish he catches in the Pocomoke River. You hear the Goat Man as he steps on brush and twigs in the swamp.  You know hear that noise and know that the area where it came from is nothing but marsh mud and quick sand.  No man or heavy animal could walk there.  But the Goat Man can. Continue reading Ghost Walk into the Pocomoke Forest

The Hungry Ghost Moon

The Hungry Ghost Moon is the name the Chinese gave to the full moon in the seventh month of the  lunar year – which happens to occur today, July 12, 2014.

Hungry Ghost Moon


In the Chinese tradition, the time of the Hungry Ghost Moon is similar to how the ancient Irish perceived Samahain, a feast marking the beginning of the Irish Winter (October 31st – Halloween in North America).  It was a time when spirits could move freely from this world into the Other world or the Eternal world.  The veil separating the worlds was “thin.”

The Chinese believed that some spirits would return to where they were happiest, so it’s a time when you might see or feel the presence of your ancestors — or the people who formerly populated the landscape surrounding you.  But it is also a time when mischievous spirits make trouble and people can be more susceptible to bad energy from the spirit world.

Continue reading The Hungry Ghost Moon